Medtech’s Big Market Movers

Overall, 2014 was a good year for the medtech world with tons of market activity. Here are the big market movers who saw millions added to their market cap and millions taken away.

Last year was a good one for medtech companies.

Large companies saw their share prices grow, with Covidien’s share price growing the most. Even as the Irish company bid goodbye to the markets as a standalone company prior to the consummation of the deal with Medtronic, it saw its share price grow the most—53%—out of large-cap medtech companies. In fact, shares of all large caps grew in 2014, according to a report by EP Vantage, the publishing arm of market intelligence firm Evaluate.

The company that performed the worst out of the large-cap companies was St. Jude Medical, whose stock inched up a mere 5%.

But among medtech companies whose market capitalization is less than $15 billion, which were the big market movers, both up and down.

Investors are believing the story OvaScience is telling of the potential of its treatments to help women with fertility challenges conceive. The company launched its Augment treatment, based on the platform technology of EggPC cells, at certain in vitro fertility clinics overseas in 2014. The company is also developing other next-generation treatments.

Last year, the Massachusetts company’s share price jumped 384%, to $44.22 from $9.14 at the end of 2013. As a result, the company added $909 million to its market cap.

Nanobiotix wants to transform therapy using its NanoXray technology portfolio. When certain nanoparticles are directly injected into cancerous tissue and radiotherapy is applied, these particles have the ability to absorb x-rays and increase the amount of radiation to destroy diseased cells. Surrounding healthy tissue do not get increased radiation doses.

Last year, the French company’s share price jumped 217%, to 16.72 euros ($18.38) from 5.27 euros ($6.85) at the end of 2013. As a result, the company added $221 million to its market cap.

Sirtex Medical has created a medical device that treats inoperable liver tumors that spread from the colon. It is a single-use permanent implant to help deliver high doses of radiation to the tumor while keeping surrounding tissue relatively unaffected.

Last year, the Australian company’s share price jumped 142%, to AUS$28.37 ($21.70) from AUS$11.73 ($10.40) at the end of 2013. As a result, the company added $782 million to its market cap.

The Sapien transcatheter heart valve, that Edwards Lifesciences introduced to the market after winning FDA approval in 2011 helped drive the company’s business performance higher.

Last year, the California company’s share price jumped 94%, to $127.38 from $65.76 at the end of 2013. As a result, the company added $6.4 billion to its market cap.

Dexcom is in the business of making continuous glucose monitors and has made remote monitoring of patients with diabetes easier—especially when it comes to young children whose parents and caregivers want to be aware of their glucose levels.

Last year, the San Diego company’s share price jumped 55%, to $55.05 from $35.41 at the end of 2013. As a result, the company added $1.67 billion to its market cap.

ReproCELL is a stem cell company emerging as a venture out of the University of Tokyo and Kyoto University. The company commercialized the first human products, iPS cell products, in 2009. These cells are are “adult cells that have been genetically reprogrammed to an embryonic stem cell–like state by being forced to express genes and factors important for maintaining the defining properties of embryonic stem cells,” according to the National Institutes of Health.

Last year, the Japanese company’s share price plummetted 55%, to 773 Japanese yen ($6.48) from 1,725 Japanese yen ($16.38) at the end of 2013. As a result, the company lost $439 billion from its market cap.

Tandem Diabetes Care went public at the end of 2013 with great fanfare. The maker of the first touchscreen insulin pump raised $138 million through its IPO.

But 2014 wasn’t as kind. Last year, the San Diego company’s share price dropped 51%, to $12.70 from $25.77 at the end of 2013. As a result, the company lost $252 million from its market cap.

Getinge is in the business of infection control to health systems and also makes products to prevent contamination for life science companies.

Last year, the Swedish company’s share price dropped 19%, to 177.80 Swedish Krona ($20.75) from 220 Swedish Krona ($33.77) at the end of 2013. As a result, $2.18 billion was wiped out from its market cap.

Elekta makes products to help in the treatment of cancer and brain disorders. Specifically, it develops products for radiation therapy, radiosurgery, and brachytherapy.

Last year, the Swedish company’s share price dropped 19%, to 79.70 Swedish Krona ($11.48) from 98.35 Swedish Krona ($15.43) at the end of 2013. As a result, $1.6 billion was wiped out from its market cap.

William Demant makes products to aid in people’s hearing and communication. They include hearing devices, hearing implants, and diagnostic instruments.

Last year, the Swedish company’s share price dropped 11%, to 468.20 Danish Krone ($68.52) from 527 Danish Krone ($97.2) at the end of 2013. As a result, $1.6 billion was wiped out from its market cap.